Roses, Wine, Music and Books

 

There will be roses, wine, music and books at the September 2016 meeting of the Charleston Lowcountry Rose Society on Sunday, September 11, 2016 at James Island Town Hall, 1238-B Camp Rd., James Island. Refreshment at 2:30 PM; Meeting at 3 PM. Please bring your roses in wine bottles and wine, cheese and something to go with the cheeses like crackers or fruit.

As part of our program, we are honoring our resident authors who have just published their new books: Rosalinda Morgan, our current president with “The Wentworth Legacy”, a historical novel

wentworth_front

and Dr. Fletcher Derrick, one of our past presidents with “Surgeon/Spy”, an autobiography.

Surgeon Spy

They will talk briefly about their books. Then there will be a book-signing afterwards. Their books will be available for sale at the meeting – The Wentworth Legacy at $18.95 and Surgeon/Spy at $20. Both books can also be purchased at www.amazon.com.  Rosalinda Morgan is a retired Certified Public Accountant and New York State Real Estate Broker Associate. She also has a degree in Art and Antique Appraisal. Dr. Fletcher Derrick is a Charleston, SC Board Certified Urologist and a Fellow of the American College of Surgeons. They are both American Rose Society Consulting Rosarians.

Ulyana Machneva, a classical guitarist and one of our new members, will play her guitar for us.

ulyana

 

Also, if anyone has had problems with their roses this summer, please bring your questions and Consulting Rosarians will be able to help you.

Join us for a fun and exciting afternoon.

Charleston Lowcountry Rose Society 2016 Annual Rose Show

Below is the schedule of the Charleston Lowcountry Rose Show:

 

Twenty-Fourth Annual

Charleston Rose Show

1-4 p.m., Saturday, April 30, 2016

James Island Town Hall

1238-B Camp Rd.

James Island, SC 29412

 

Entries Accepted 7-10 a.m.

Judging Begins 10:15 a.m.

Show Open to Public 1-4 p.m.

 

Welcome to the Charleston Rose Show

 

On behalf of the Charleston Lowcountry Rose Society I extend a warm welcome to all of the exhibitors and visitors to our 24th Annual Charleston Rose Show. I hope that each of you enjoys what is considered by many rosarians in the Carolinas to be one of the best shows held annually.  I thank our sponsors, patrons, and supporters, and especially the members of our society who have worked many long hours to assure the success of this show.

We have an educational booth set up to provide you with information on roses and their culture.

We also encourage you to visit our meetings and join our society!  Our meetings are held the first Sunday of each month, September through June (with the exception of September and January meetings, which are held the second Sunday), at 3 p. m. at James Island Town Hall, 1238-B Camp Rd., James Island, SC 29412. Our December meeting is a banquet elsewhere.
 

Rosalinda Morgan, President
 

Rose Show Committees Chair: Mary Lee Kirkland 843-795-1525

ARS Records: Julia Copeland and Tina Hogarth

Awards: Rosalinda Morgan

Certificates: Pat Gibson

Clerks:  Mary Beth Martin-Petrovick

Community Liaison: Matt Morgan

Horticulture Division Schedule: Sandy Lundberg

Judges: Sandy Lundberg

Photographer: Mary Lee Kirkland

Photography Exhibit: Bill Prioleau

Properties: Robert Priest

Registration: Bill Prioleau

Rose Sales: Kathy Woolsey

Schedule Layout: Mary Beth Martin-Petrovick

Show Layout: Bob Lundberg

Show Placement: Fletcher Derrick

JUDGES Chair of Judges: Sandy Lundberg

Horticulture: Rita Van Lenten, Frank Van Lenten, Mary Myers, Don Myers

DIVISION I    ROSE HORTICULTURE

Rules for Horticulture Exhibits

1. TIME AND PLACE. Entries will be accepted at James Island Town Hall, 1238-B Camp Rd., James Island, SC 29412 between the hours of 7:00 a.m. and 10:00 a.m. only. All exhibitors must register with the Registration Clerk and obtain an exhibitor’s number. Entries will not be accepted after 10:00 a.m. when the show area will be closed except to the Placement Committee, clerks, judges and designated show officials.

2. WHO MAY EXHIBI? All rose growers are cordially invited to exhibit in this show. Membership in a rose society is not required. All specimens must have been grown by the exhibitor in his/her own outdoor garden. Only one person or team may enter from one garden.

3. NOVICE, AND JUDGES’ CLASSES. Novice classes are limited to exhibitors who have never won a blue ribbon in an ARS-accredited show. Novices may also enter all show classes. Judges of this show and members of their immediate families may exhibit only in classes designated for them.

4. ENTRY TAGS. Official ARS entry tags must be used and will be provided. Both top and bottom of each tag must be completed, including the exhibitor’s number.

5. ROSE NAMES. Roses must be listed in an ARS-recognized publication with an ARS exhibition name to be eligible for entry.

6. MULTIPLE ENTRIES. As many entries as desired may be made in each class, provided each entry is a different variety or combination of varieties unless otherwise noted. Duplicate entries will be disqualified.

7. GROOMING. Leaves should be free of any residue. Any specimen may have side buds or spent blooms removed to improve appearance. This must be done skillfully in order to avoid penalty. Stem length should be in proportion to the size of the bloom.

8. WEDGES AND CONTAINERS. Plastic wrap or Styrofoam wedges may be used to position specimens, but should not protrude above the container. Uniform containers will be provided except as noted. Exhibitors are urged to show all large roses with at least 3 inches of stem in the water, miniatures with 1-1/2 inches.

9. ONE BLOOM PER STEM. Entries must be shown without side buds. Except as noted, each specimen should be at exhibition stage. Generally, the exhibition bloom is considered in its most perfect form when 1/2 to 3/4 open. It should be noted, however, some varieties are most perfect when fully open.

10. FULLY OPEN. Entries must be shown with one bloom per stem, no side buds. Stamens must show. Varieties of less than 12 petals or less may not be shown in this class.

11. SPRAYS. Entries must be sprays having two or more blooms. Hybrid Teas and Grandifloras should display blooms as near to exhibition stage as the variety permits. Floribundas and Polyanthas are exhibited as they are naturally grown. All sprays are judged for overall form and individual floret form. Discreet disbudding is permitted.

12. CLIMBERS. Entries must be one stem with one or more blooms, naturally grown or disbudded. Large-flowered Climbers (LCl) must be entered in Class 2O. All other roses with the word “Climbing” as part of their horticultural classification must be entered in the same classes as their respective bush counterparts.

13. OLD GARDEN ROSES BEFORE 1867. The cultivar must have been introduced prior to 1867. Side buds, sprays and stem-on-stem are permitted.  To be eligible for the Dowager Queen award, the date of introduction must be written in the upper right corner of the entry tag.

14. OLD GARDEN ROSES IN OR AFTER 1867. These roses include Old Garden Roses with unknown dates of introduction and those introduced in 1867 or later. Side buds, sprays and stem-on-stem are permitted.

15. ROSE BOWLS AND PICTURE FRAMES. ARS rules will be followed. Overall appearance will replace the points normally allotted to stems and foliage. Entries are limited to one entry per class per exhibitor. All properties, such as vases, containers, staging hardware, etc., will be available on a first come, first served basis.

16. PLACEMENT. All entries will be placed on the show tables by the Placement Committee. Entries may be moved as needed by the placement committee. Once placed, no entry may be withdrawn. The Placement Committee will place entries alphabetically, by variety, within each class.

17. GUIDELINES FOR JUDGING. ARS Accredited Judges, who may be assisted by ARS Apprentice Judges, will judge the show. ARS Guidelines for Judging Roses will be followed to include the following Point Scale: Form 25 Substance 15 Color 20  Stem and Foliage 20 Balance and Proportion 10 Size 10 Judges will disqualify entries for the following reasons: a. Misnamed, misclassed, unlabeled or mislabeled entries b. Stem-on-stem, except for Species, Old Garden Roses and Shrubs c. Foreign substances applied to foliage, stem or bloom to improve appearance d. Side buds on a specimen, which must be shown disbudded e. Violation of ARS or local show rules f. Appearance of exhibitor’s name anywhere other than the designated place on the entry tag.

18. THE QUEEN, KING, PRINCESS OF SHOW AND COURT OF HONOR (3 runners-up). Selected from the blue ribbon winners in Class 6.

19. PRINCE OF SHOW. Selected from blue ribbon winners in Class 12.

20. MINIATURE QUEEN, KING, PRINCESS AND COURT OF HONOR (3 runners-up). Selected from blue ribbon winners in Class 23.

21. MINIFLORA QUEEN, KING, PRINCESS AND COURT OF HONOR (3 runners up). Selected from blue ribbon winners in Class 28.

22. NOVICE QUEEN AND KING. The Novice Queen will be selected from blue ribbon winners in Class 30A. The Novice King will be selected from blue ribbon winner of Class 30B. .

23. RIBBONS, AWARDS AND CERTIFICATES. Judges may give or withhold awards, including ribbons, if, in their judgment, an exhibit does not merit an award. Blue, red, yellow and white ribbons will be given where merited. Only blue ribbon winners are eligible for ARS Awards, ARS Certificates and other Rose Show Awards. Only blue ribbon entries will qualify for the Awards Table. Decisions of the judges are final.

24. CONTROL OF ENTRIES AND EXHIBITS. All entries will become the property of the Show Committee. All exhibits, ribbons and entry tags must remain undisturbed until the close of the show at 4 p.m. After they are placed on the show tables, entries are under control of the Show Committee. This committee reserves the right to add water and to remove wilted or inferior blooms at any time during the show.

25. AWARDS. Exhibitors should make necessary arrangements to claim their awards. Awards will not be mailed. Certificates and ribbons will be mailed to exhibitors only upon request at time of registration.

26.  RESPONSIBILITY. The Charleston Lowcountry Rose Society, its members will not assume responsibility or liability for damage or loss to any person or property. Exhibitors must make necessary arrangements to claim their vases, arrangements and personal property at the end of the show at 4 p.m.

27. QUESTIONS. Any questions that arise and are not covered by these rules will be referred to the Show Chairman for resolution.

 

 

Horticulture Exhibit Classes

 

LARGE COLLECTION CLASSES

 

Class 1. COLLECTION OF 3 HYBRID TEAS OR GRANDIFLORAS.

Same variety or different varieties, one bloom per stem, exhibition stage, exhibited in one container.

 

Class 2. CYCLE OF BLOOM. Three (3) Hybrid Tea or Grandiflora specimens, same variety, one bud, one exhibition stage, and one fully open, exhibited in one container.

 

Class 3. ROSE BOWL (EXHIBITION). One (1 hybrid tea bloom floating in bowl of water, exhibition stage, no foliage.

 

Class 4. HYBRID TEA PICTURE FRAME. One (1) hybrid tea bloom, exhibition stage with no foliage, mounted in a picture frame supplied by the society.

 

Class 5. ROSE BOUQUET. Any Hybrid Teas, Grandifloras and/or Floribundas. Any number, any stage of bloom, displayed in a container provided by the exhibitor. At least three different varieties. Not necessary to list names on entry card.

 

HYBRID TEAS and GRANDIFLORA

 

 Class 6. ROYALTY AWARDS. Hybrid teas, grandifloras and their climbing counterparts. Varieties of more than twelve petals, one bloom per stem, no side buds, exhibition stage. This class eligible for Queen.

 

Class 7. HYBRID TEA OR GRANDIFLORA SPRAY. Varieties of more than twelve petals, one stem with two or more blooms at exhibition stage.

 

Class 8. FULLY OPEN HYBRID TEAS AND GRANDIFLORAS. One bloom per stem, no side buds, stamens must be visible and fresh.

 

Class 9. FRAGRANT ROSES. Any fragrant specimen, one bloom per stem or spray, any stage of bloom.

 

FLORIBUNDAS 

 

Class 10. FLORIBUNDA ONE BLOOM PER STEM. Individual specimens, displaying hybrid tea form, exhibition stage, no side buds.   Singles and decorative specimens excluded.

 

Class 11. FLORIBUNDA – INFORMAL FORM. Individual specimens displaying decorative form and/or those with 4-8 petals (or are classed as a single by an ARS publication).

 

Class 12. FLORIBUNDA SPRAYS. Individual spray specimen, two or more blooms per stem, discreet disbudding permitted. This class eligible for Prince.

 

POLYANTHAS

 

Class 13. POLYANTHA SPRAYS. Individual spray specimen, two or more blooms, discreet disbudding permitted.

 

LARGE- FLOWERED CLIMBERS

 

Class 14. TRUE CLIMBER. Exhibition specimen, may be individual bloom or spray. (All climbing Hybrid Teas, Grandifloras, and Floribundas are to be exhibited in their respective counterpart sections).

 

 

SHRUBS

 

Class 15. CLASSIC SHRUB. Includes hybrid kordesii, hybrid moyesii, hybrid musk, and hybrid rugosa. Spray or one bloom per stem, stem-on-stem permitted.

 

 

Class 16.  MODERN SHRUB

  1. MODERN SHRUB. Includes all roses listed as shrubs (S). Spray or one bloom per stem, stem-on-stem permitted. David Austin roses.
  2. KNOCKOUT ROSES A stem of Knockout Rose.

 

OLD GARDEN ROSES

 

Class 17. OLD GARDEN ROSES PRIOR TO 1867. May be individual specimen or spray including noisettes, side buds, stem-on-stem are permitted. Dowager Queen will be awarded from this class.  Write the date of introduction on the upper right corner of the entry tag.

 

Class 18. OLD GARDEN ROSES IN OR AFTER 1867. May be individual specimen or spray, including noisettes introduced since 1867, side buds, stem-on-stem are permitted. The Victorian Rose Certificate will be awarded from this class.

 

MINIATURE/MINIFLORA COLLECTION CLASSES

 

Class 19. MINIATURE or MINIFLORA CYCLE OF BLOOM. Three (3) individual specimens, same variety, one bud, one exhibition stage and one fully open exhibited in one container.

 

Class 20. COLLECTION THREE DIFFERENT OR SAME INIATURES/MINIFLORAS.

One bloom per stem, different or same varieties, exhibition stage, exhibited in one container.

 

Class 21. MINIATURE/MINIFLORA ROSE BOWL (EXHIBITION). One (1) miniature/miniflora bloom floating in bowl of water, exhibition stage, no foliage.

 

Class 22. MINIATURE/MINIFLORA ROSE BOUQUET. Any extra miniatures/

minifloras, any number, any stage of bloom, at least three different varieties, in container provided by exhibitor. Not necessary to list varieties on entry card.

 

MINIATURES

 

Class 23.   ROYALTY AWARDS: MINIATURE ROSES. One bloom per stem, exhibition stage, no side buds, varieties of more than 12 petals. This class eligible for Mini Queen.

 

Class 24.   MINIATURE SPRAYS. One stem with 2 or more blooms, varieties of more than twelve petals.

 

Class 25.  FULLY OPEN MINIATURE/MINIFLORA ROSES. One bloom per stem, no side buds, varieties of more than twelve petals, stamens must show.

 

Class 26.  SINGLE MINIATURE/MINIFLORA ROSES. Varieties of 4 to 8 petals, may be one bloom per stem or spray.

 

Class 27.  MINIATURE/MINIFLORA PICTURE FRAME. One mini/miniflora, exhibition stage mounted in a picture frame supplied by the society.

 

MINIFLORAS

 

Class 28. ROYALTY AWARDS: MINIFLORA ROSES. One bloom per stem, exhibition stage, no side buds. This class eligible for Miniflora Queen.

 

Class 29. MINIFLORA SPRAYS. One stem with 2 or more blooms, varieties of more than twelve petals.

 

NOVICE

 

Class 30. A. HYBRID TEAS, GRANDIFLORAS, FLORIBUNDAS.

One bloom per stem, no side buds, exhibition stage or

B. MINIATURE/MINIFLORA ROSES. One bloom per stem, no side buds, exhibition stage.

 

JUDGES’ CLASSES

 

Class 31. COLLECTION OF 3 MINIATURE/MINIFLORA ROSES or COLLECTION OF 3 HYBRID TEAS, GRANDIFLORAS.  May be same or different varieties displayed in separate vases each with an individual entry.

 

 

ROSE PHOTOGRAPHY CONTEST

At the Rose Show on April 30, 2016 at James Island Town Hall, 1238-B Camp Rd., James Island, SC, there will also be a Rose Photography Contest open only to members of Charleston Lowcountry Rose Society. If you want to show your rose photography and you are not a member yet, you can join the Charleston Lowcountry Rose Society at the show by paying $15 for single membership or $20 for family membership. There will be 9 categories ranging from photos of single bloom and spray of roses to rose garden photography and abstract impression of roses.

Information about the society and how to grow beautiful roses will be available during the Rose Show.

Admission to the show is free.

CATEGORIES:

Class 1: One bloom, at its most perfect stage, HT, Gr, F of any variety including singles, no sidebuds.

Class 2: One spray, HT, Gr, F, Polyantha, two or more blooms.

Class 3: One bloom of a miniature or miniflora, no sidebuds

Class 4: A spray of a miniature or miniflora

Class 5: One Bloom of Shrub or Old Garden Rose

Class 6: A spray of a Shrub or Old Garden Rose

Class 7: Open bloom of rose(s) of any class, stamens must show.

Class 8: A photo of any rose garden or any rose society activity

Class 9: Abstract or Impressionism: A photo having non-objective design, form or content, of a rose plant(s) or any portion thereof. Does not include abstract arrangements.

Contest Rules:

  1. Contest is open only to members of the Charleston Lowcountry Rose Society and must have taken all photographs entered. Any contestants who have not paid their current year’s dues will be ineligible.
  2. Contestants are permitted to enter a maximum of three photographs per class in all classes. However, contestants may enter only one photo of a particular variety in ANY class. Photos can be in 4” x 6” or 5” x 7” size but no frame or matting is allowed.
  3. Duplicate photos may NOT be entered in different classes.
  4. The rose photos must be entered with the ARS approved exhibition name. Grooming the rose(s) is encouraged and artificial backgrounds may be used.
  5. Photographs need to be submitted in the following format: class number with the letters a-c for multiple pictures in the same class, last name of the contestant and the approved exhibition name of the rose. An example would be 1a-Morgan – Gemini; 1b-Morgan – Queen Elizabeth; 1c-Morgan – Betty Boop. Tag should be taped in back of the photo. Any text in front of the entry will be cause for disqualification.
  6. Any photographs may be enhanced by the use of any graphic program, such as Photoshop, Elements or Photo Impact.
  7. Any individual who enters this contest give express permission to CLRS to use their photos for our educational display at various Charleston libraries in May. Photos will be returned to contestants in June.
  8. Class 1-5 will be judged 50% on exhibition quality and 50% on photographic excellence. Class 6 – 9 will be judged on photographic excellence only.
  9. The judges reserve the right to disqualify any entry that does not conform to the stated rules prior to the entries being judged.
  10. There will be awards in each class: Blue ribbons for first place; Red ribbons for second place and Yellow ribbons for third place. The Blue ribbons winners in each class will be eligible for Best of Rose Photography Contest Award.

Charleston Lowcountry Rose Society April 2016 Meeting

Lundbergs at 2014 National 2

The Charleston Lowcountry Rose Society will meet at James Island Town Hall, 1238-B Camp Rd., James Island, SC on Sunday, April 3. Social Hour – 2:30 pm; Meeting – 3:00 pm. The program is “Rose Show Preparation: From the Garden to the Show Table” to be given by Bob Lundberg. Bob Lundberg is an American Rose Society consulting rosarian and an accredited rose judge. He has won several top awards at rose shows locally and around the country and is one of the top rose exhibitors in the country.

Bob will give us the information needed to be successful at a rose show. He will walk us through the entire process from cutting the rose to putting the rose on the show table to be judged. For those who are interested in showing their roses, this is a program not to be missed.

You can also bring your questions on how to grow beautiful roses. Consulting rosarians will be on hand to answer your questions.

Meeting is open to the public. Admission is free.

 Come and join us.

For more info about Charleston Lowcountry Rose Society, email Rosalinda Morgan, CLRS President at RosalindaRM@comcast.net.

Rose Photography Contest at James Island Town Hall

IMG_0340

At the Rose Show on April 30, 2016 at James Island Town Hall, 1238B Camp Rd., James Island, SC, there will also be a Rose Photography Contest open only to members of Charleston Lowcountry Rose Society. If you want to show your rose photography and you are not a member yet, you can join the Charleston Lowcountry Rose Society at the show by paying $15 for single membership or $20 for family membership. There will be 9 categories ranging from photos of single bloom and spray of roses to rose garden photography and abstract impression of roses.

Information about the society and how to grow beautiful roses will be available during the Rose Show.

Admission to the show is free.

CATEGORIES:

Class 1: One bloom, at its most perfect stage, HT, Gr, F of any variety including singles, no sidebuds.

Class 2: One spray, FT, Gr, F, Polyantha, two or more blooms.

Class 3: One bloom of a miniature or miniflora, no sidebuds

Class 4: A spray of a miniature or miniflora

Class 5: One Bloom of Shrub or Old Garden Rose

Class 6: A spray of a Shrub or Old Garden Rose

Class 7: Open bloom rose(s) of any class, stamens must show.

Class 8: A photo of any rose garden or any rose society activity

Class 9: Abstract or Impressionism: A photo having non-objective design, form or content, of a rose plant(s) or any portion thereof. Does not include abstract arrangements.

Contest Rules:

  1. Contest is open only to members of the Charleston Lowcountry Rose Society and must have taken all photographs entered. Any contestants who have not paid their current year’s dues will be ineligible.
  2. Contestants are permitted to enter a maximum of three photographs per class in all classes. However, contestants may enter only one photo of a particular variety in ANY class. Photos can be in 4” x 6” or 5” x 7” size but no frame or matting is allowed.
  3. Duplicate photos may NOT be entered in different classes.
  4. The rose photos must be entered with the ARS approved exhibition name. Grooming the rose(s) is encouraged and artificial backgrounds may be used.
  5. Photographs need to be submitted in the following format: class number with the letters a-c for multiple pictures in the same class, last name of the contestant and the approved exhibition name of the rose. An example would be 1a-Morgan – Gemini; 1b-Morgan – Queen Elizabeth; 1c-Morgan – Betty Boop. Tag should be taped in back of the photo. Any text in front of the entry will be cause for disqualification.
  6. Any photographs may be enhanced by the use of any graphic program, such as Photoshop, Elements or Photo Impact.
  7. Any individual who enters this contest give express permission to CLRS to use their photos for our educational display at various Charleston libraries in May. Photos will be returned to contestants in June.
  8. Class 1-5 will be judged 50% on exhibition quality and 50% on photographic excellence. Class 6 & 7 will be judged on photographic excellence only.
  9. The judges reserve the right to disqualify any entry that does not conform to the stated rules prior to the entries being judged.
  10. There will be awards in each class: Blue ribbons for first place; Red ribbons for second place and Yellow ribbons for third place. The Blue ribbons winners in each class will be eligible for Best of Contest Award.

Charleston Lowcountry Rose Society Annual Oyster Roast

oysters

Oysters anyone? Join the Charleston Lowcountry Rose Society for their annual fundraising event – Family Oyster/BBQ Roast at Bowen’s Island Restaurant on Sunday, Mar. 20, 2016 from 2 to 4 PM. All you can eat oysters for $20 for adults and $8 for kids up to 12 years old. You can bring your own favorite beverage. There will be desserts for sale also. You can buy tickets at the door or email RosalindaRM@comcast.net to make a reservation.

For more information about the Charleston Lowcountry Rose Society, go to our home page.

Charleston Lowcountry Rose Society March 2016 Meeting

Kathy Rice Woolsey, the Garden Rambler and a former Vice President of the Charleston Lowcountry Rose Society will present a program on “Sustainable Rose Gardening” at the March meeting of the Charleston Lowcountry Rose Society. The program will cover rose selection and site preparation.

Ms. Woolsey has a degree in Horticulture from VA Tech and is the former Garden Curator of Cypress Gardens, where she tended a collection of 150 antique roses. She is a garden and nature writer and regularly contributes to The JI Messenger, South Carolina Gardener Magazine and Planting Seeds Sustainable Living Magazine. Kathy is a long time member of the Charleston Lowcountry Rose Society and Camellia Garden Club.

The Society meetings are open to the public and begin at 3 pm at the James Island Town Hall, 1238-B Camp Rd. Refreshment will be served at the social time beginning at 2:30. Expert rose growers will be on hand to answer question during the social.

 

Charleston Lowcountry Rose Society Feb 2016 Meeting

The Charleston Lowcountry Rose Society will meet at James Island Town Hall on Sunday, Feb. 7. Social Hour – 2:30 pm; Meeting – 3:00 pm. The speaker is Jay Hiers, the curator of the Edisto Rose Garden in Orangeburg, SC. and the current Regional Director and past Carolina District Director of the American Rose Society. The topic is Rose Gardening at Edisto Garden. Meeting is open to the public. Admission is free.

Come and join us.

For info on membership to Charleston Lowcountry Rose Society, email Pat Hibbard at charlestonrose@bellsouth.net.

MAIL ORDER ROSE SUPPLIERS

 

Now is the time to plan our rose garden. The box stores and local nurseries do not carry roses that we enjoy. They are just selling Knock Out roses. If you are looking where to buy good roses, I recommend you use the mail order rose suppliers. They are the best sources of roses. In my years of rose gardening which started in 1971, I have always bought my roses through mail order suppliers and I have been very happy with them. The following is a list of rose suppliers that I have used over the years and they have excellent roses and their services are outstanding.

 

Antique Rose Emporium

9300 Lueckemeyer Road

Brenham, TX 77833-6453

PH: 800-441-0002

Email: roses@weareroses.com

Website: www.antiqueroseemporium.com

 

Chamblee’s Rose Nursery

10926 US Hwy 69 N

Tyler, TX 75706-5933

PH: 800-256-7673

Email: roses@tyler.net

Website:www.chambleeroses.com

 

David Austin Roses Limited

15059 State Highway, 64 West

Tyler, TX 75704

PH: 800-328-8893

Email: US@davidaustinroses.com

Website: www.davidaustinroses.com

10% discount to ARS members

 

Edmunds’ Roses

6235 S.W. Kahle Road

Wilsonville, OR 97070

PH: 888-481-7673

Email: info@edmundsroses.com

Website: www.edmundsroses.com

 

Heirloom Roses

24062 Riverside Drive NE

St. Paul, OR 97137

PH: 503-538-1576

Website: www.heirloomroses.com

10% discount to ARS members

 

High Country Roses

P.O. Box 22901

Denver, CO 80222

PH: 800-552-2082

Website: www.highcountryroses.com

 

J.W. Jung Seed Co.

335 S. High St.

Randolph, WI 53957-0001

PH: 800-247-5864

Website: www.jungseed.com

 

K&M Roses

1260 Chicora River Rd.

Buckatunna, MS 39322

PH: 601-648-2908

Email: info@kandmroses.com

Website: www.kandmroses.com

 

Northland Rosarium

9405 S. Williams Lane

Spokane, WA 99224

PH: 509-448-4968

Website: www.northlandrosarium.com

 

Regan Nursery

4286 Decoto Road

Fremont, CA 94555

PH: 510-797-3222

Email: regan@regannursery.com

Website: www.regannursery.com

 

Rogue Valley Roses

P.O. Box 116

Phoenix, OR 97504

PH: 541-535-1307

Website: www.roguevalleyroses.com

10% discount to ARS members

 

Rosemania

4020 Trail Ridge Dr.

Franklin, TN 37067

PH: 888-600-9665

Website – www.rosemania.com

 

Roses Unlimited

363 N. Deerwood Dr.

Laurens, SC 29360

PH: 864-682-7673

Website: www.rosesunlimitedownroot.com

 

Roses of Yesterday & Today Rose Garden

803 Brown’s Valley Road

Watsonville, CA 95076

PH: 831-728-1901

Website: www.rosesofyesterday.com

 

Spring Hill Nurseries

110 West Elm St.

Tipp City, OH 45371-1699

PH: 812-537-2177

Website: www.springhillnursery.com

 

Wayside Gardens

1 Garden Lane

Hodges, SC 29695-0001

PH: 800-845-1124

Website: www.waysidegardens.com

 

White Flower Farm

P.O. Box 50

Litchfield, CT 06759-0050

Ph: 800-503-9624

Website: www.whiteflowerfarm.com

 

Until next time – Stop and smell the roses.

Rosalinda, The Rose Lady

Rosalinda Morgan

Author & Garden Writer

 

 

January 2016 Meeting

The January meeting this coming Sunday, Jan. 10, 2015 will be at James Island Town Hall, 1238-B Camp Rd., James Island. Please note the venue change. Use your GPS or MapQuest. It’s near the James Island Library. There is also a shopping center near there and a Dollar General. Use the right side door, not the main door of the Town Hall. Social Hour at 2:30 pm, Meeting at 3:00 pm.

We are doing something different this month. Instead of a speaker, it will be a members’ discussion. The topic is Getting To Know You. We will have individuals tell a bit about themselves, how they got started with roses and where they are today with their rose-growing – more, less, the same and varieties they find themselves best at growing where they live. It will be an interesting exchange and surely we’ll learn something new from each other.

Come and join us at James Island Town Hall on Sunday, Jan. 10 at 3 pm. Admission is free.

 

AN ANNUAL RITUAL-ROSE PRUNING!

By Sandy Lundberg

 

 

As the end of February approaches, it will again be time to prune roses in the Lowcountry. In order to approach this job effectively, it is desirable to have an understanding of the concept of pruning.   As a rose plant matures each year, it produces new canes. These newer canes are the most desirable, because they will be the most vigorous producers of flowers. Older canes may have become unproductive simply because of the aging of the plant or damage from winds and cold. Removal of these canes will allow room for new productive canes to emerge. There will also be a lot of twiggy growth that will produce inferior stems if not removed.

 

Exactly when should we prune? Let your rose bush and the weather channel be your guide. Generally, it is ideal to prune when the bud eyes have become red and swollen to about very small pea size.   However, we remember what happened two years ago with the early March freezes. Emerging growth of several inches was frozen. For that reason, many area rosarians, including myself delay pruning. We are now waiting until the last week of February in our garden to begin pruning, depending on the weather forecasts.

 

As you begin, pull back the mulch to expose the bud union. Remove any small, twiggy growth, clearing out the middle of the plant. These small canes and branches left in the center are an invitation for disease and insects. Study the canes that are left. Remove any damaged or diseased canes flush with the bud union. The number of canes you leave on the plant will depend on your goals for your garden. If you exhibit and want larger, but fewer flowers, you will want to leave from 3 to 5 canes. If you want garden display, you may want to leave a few more. Now you need to determine which canes to remove. Be sure to remove the cane flush with the bud union and seal.   If any are crossing or rubbing each other, remove the smallest one. If there are canes that are interfering with the plant next to it, you should remove them also.   Leave last year’s new canes if they are undamaged. If any sucker growth is present, remove it also.

 

Cut the canes at a 45 degree angle to an outside healthy bud eye. The height depends on personal preference. If you want fewer, but larger blooms for exhibition, you will want to cut lower. Most exhibitors prune to about 18 to 20 inches. Any canes that have blackened freeze damage should be cut below the damaged area. The same is true for canes damaged by cane borers. This damage can be seen when the cane’s center (pith) is brown. Continue cutting back until healthy white pith can be seen. If you have to go back to the point where the cane is only a few inches short, it is best to remove the cane entirely.   When finished, the bush should have a vase shape with the center completely open. The pruning cuts should be sealed with a sealer such as Elmer’s Glue.

 

In order to encourage basal breaks, you can peel off the loose layers of bark that overlay the bud union or if the bark is not loose, you may gently scrub some off with a wire brush. As long as no late freezes are expected, leave the mulch pushed back to expose the bud union. The exposure to sunshine helps encourage basal breaks.

 

Immediately after pruning, the bushes and surrounding ground should be sprayed with a good fungicide and a good insecticide. Thereafter it is essential that your disease and pest management program be strictly adhered to.   Remove any diseased leaves that may be lying on the ground.

 

At this time, your organic mixture should be lightly scratched into the ground. We use 3 cups per hybrid tea and floribunda and 1 cup per miniature rose.

 

Pruning of floribundas follows the same principles as apply to hybrid teas with a couple of notable exceptions. Generally, floribundas that produce sprays are pruned higher and not as many canes removed. The floribundas that are noted for producing one bloom per stem, such as Sheila’s Perfume, will be pruned the same as hybrid teas.

 

Miniature roses are pruned with the following principle in mind. Remove the smaller, weaker canes, any twiggy growth, and any damaged canes. The number of canes left will depend on the age of the plant. Some newer minis may only have three or four good canes established, where some older plants may have as many as ten or more. Since they are on their own roots, there is not the concern to make room on a bud union for new canes. As with hybrid teas, however, the ideal is to open the middle of the plant as a disease and pest prevention measure. Usually, the height to which I prune depends on the age and thickness of the canes. About 12 to 15 inches for a large mini bush with large canes is sufficient.

 

Good quality tools will make this job much easier:

  1. Felco pruners (never use flat blade pruners as they mash the canes)
  2. Lobbing shears
  3. Pruning saw
  4. Thorn resistant gloves
  5. Elmer’s glue
  6. Wire brush
  7. A jar of alcohol (dip the pruners frequently to avoid transmitting disease)

It is a good idea to carry all of these in a plastic tote.

 

Note: We bought the Felco folding saw and it is great! I don’t have a lot of strength in my right wrist due to rheumatoid arthritis damage. With this saw I can easily saw through very thick canes.