Charleston Lowcountry Rose Society February 2017 Meeting

The Charleston Lowcountry Rose Society will have their February 2017 meeting on Sunday, Feb. 12 at James Island Town Hall, 1238-B Camp Rd., James Island. Admission is FREE. Social at 2:30 pm. Meeting starts at 3:00 pm and ends around 4 pm. The program is about “Pruning your Roses” by Bob Lundberg. Bob will discuss the tools needed to accomplish the pruning tasks, the reason why we prune and the different approaches to pruning different classes of roses. There will be a demonstration of spring pruning of Hybrid Tea and miniature rose plant. If anyone has roses in a pot, you may bring them to the meeting and we will try to include them in the demonstration.

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Bob Lundberg is the Charleston Lowcountry Rose Society Consulting Rosarian chair. He is an American Rose Society Master Rosarian and accredited American Rose Society judge. He and his wife, Sandy, maintain a rose garden of about 400 roses in Blufton, SC and are top rose exhibitors, having won numerous awards from rose shows all over the country.

 

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Charleston Lowcountry Rose Society November Meeting

The Charleston Lowcountry Rose Society is having their November meeting at James Island Town Hall, 1238-B Camp Rd., James Island  on Sunday, Nov. 6. Social at 2:30 pm; meeting at 3 pm. Admission is open to the public and is free. The November speaker is Sandy Lundberg, a CLRS past president, American Rose Society Consulting Rosarian and ARS accredited judge. Sandy maintains a rose garden of 400 rose bushes at her home in Blufton, SC and is a top rose exhibitor in the country. Sandy will have a slide presentation of new rose introductions that show great promise or are known to be performing well in the low country. So be ready to take notes of her recommendations.

Hope to see you all.

Rosalinda Morgan

President, Charleston Lowcountry Rose Society

 

Charleston Lowcountry Rose Society October Meeting

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The Charleston Lowcountry Rose Society will meet at James Island Town Hall, 1238-B Camp Road., James Island, SC 29412 on Sunday, Oct. 2.  Social Hour – 2:30 pm; Meeting – 3:00 pm. The program is Rooting Roses by Kathy Woolsey. Meeting is open to the public. Admission is free.

October is a good time to propagate old garden roses and share them with friends. Horticulturist Kathy Woolsey will show you how to root roses with just stuff you have around the house. Please bring cutting from one of your favorite roses. Use a ball point pen and write the name of the rose on the leaves. If you have any plastic sleeves that newspapers come in, please bring them and hand pruners.   Other materials will be provided.

Our speaker, Kathy Woolsey is a past vice president of the Charleston Lowcountry Rose Society. She has a degree in Horticulture from VA Tech and is the former Garden Curator of Cypress Gardens, where she tended a collection of 150 antique roses. She is a garden and nature writer and regularly contributes to The JI Messenger, South Carolina Gardener Magazine and Planting Seeds Sustainable Living Magazine. Kathy is a long time member of the Charleston Lowcountry Rose Society and Camellia Garden Club.

Come and join us.

For info on membership to Charleston Lowcountry Rose Society, email Pat Hibbard at charlestonrose@bellsouth.net.

Charleston Lowcountry Rose Society April 2016 Meeting

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The Charleston Lowcountry Rose Society will meet at James Island Town Hall, 1238-B Camp Rd., James Island, SC on Sunday, April 3. Social Hour – 2:30 pm; Meeting – 3:00 pm. The program is “Rose Show Preparation: From the Garden to the Show Table” to be given by Bob Lundberg. Bob Lundberg is an American Rose Society consulting rosarian and an accredited rose judge. He has won several top awards at rose shows locally and around the country and is one of the top rose exhibitors in the country.

Bob will give us the information needed to be successful at a rose show. He will walk us through the entire process from cutting the rose to putting the rose on the show table to be judged. For those who are interested in showing their roses, this is a program not to be missed.

You can also bring your questions on how to grow beautiful roses. Consulting rosarians will be on hand to answer your questions.

Meeting is open to the public. Admission is free.

 Come and join us.

For more info about Charleston Lowcountry Rose Society, email Rosalinda Morgan, CLRS President at RosalindaRM@comcast.net.

Charleston Lowcountry Rose Society March 2016 Meeting

Kathy Rice Woolsey, the Garden Rambler and a former Vice President of the Charleston Lowcountry Rose Society will present a program on “Sustainable Rose Gardening” at the March meeting of the Charleston Lowcountry Rose Society. The program will cover rose selection and site preparation.

Ms. Woolsey has a degree in Horticulture from VA Tech and is the former Garden Curator of Cypress Gardens, where she tended a collection of 150 antique roses. She is a garden and nature writer and regularly contributes to The JI Messenger, South Carolina Gardener Magazine and Planting Seeds Sustainable Living Magazine. Kathy is a long time member of the Charleston Lowcountry Rose Society and Camellia Garden Club.

The Society meetings are open to the public and begin at 3 pm at the James Island Town Hall, 1238-B Camp Rd. Refreshment will be served at the social time beginning at 2:30. Expert rose growers will be on hand to answer question during the social.

 

Charleston Lowcountry Rose Society Feb 2016 Meeting

The Charleston Lowcountry Rose Society will meet at James Island Town Hall on Sunday, Feb. 7. Social Hour – 2:30 pm; Meeting – 3:00 pm. The speaker is Jay Hiers, the curator of the Edisto Rose Garden in Orangeburg, SC. and the current Regional Director and past Carolina District Director of the American Rose Society. The topic is Rose Gardening at Edisto Garden. Meeting is open to the public. Admission is free.

Come and join us.

For info on membership to Charleston Lowcountry Rose Society, email Pat Hibbard at charlestonrose@bellsouth.net.

MAIL ORDER ROSE SUPPLIERS

 

Now is the time to plan our rose garden. The box stores and local nurseries do not carry roses that we enjoy. They are just selling Knock Out roses. If you are looking where to buy good roses, I recommend you use the mail order rose suppliers. They are the best sources of roses. In my years of rose gardening which started in 1971, I have always bought my roses through mail order suppliers and I have been very happy with them. The following is a list of rose suppliers that I have used over the years and they have excellent roses and their services are outstanding.

 

Antique Rose Emporium

9300 Lueckemeyer Road

Brenham, TX 77833-6453

PH: 800-441-0002

Email: roses@weareroses.com

Website: www.antiqueroseemporium.com

 

Chamblee’s Rose Nursery

10926 US Hwy 69 N

Tyler, TX 75706-5933

PH: 800-256-7673

Email: roses@tyler.net

Website:www.chambleeroses.com

 

David Austin Roses Limited

15059 State Highway, 64 West

Tyler, TX 75704

PH: 800-328-8893

Email: US@davidaustinroses.com

Website: www.davidaustinroses.com

10% discount to ARS members

 

Edmunds’ Roses

6235 S.W. Kahle Road

Wilsonville, OR 97070

PH: 888-481-7673

Email: info@edmundsroses.com

Website: www.edmundsroses.com

 

Heirloom Roses

24062 Riverside Drive NE

St. Paul, OR 97137

PH: 503-538-1576

Website: www.heirloomroses.com

10% discount to ARS members

 

High Country Roses

P.O. Box 22901

Denver, CO 80222

PH: 800-552-2082

Website: www.highcountryroses.com

 

J.W. Jung Seed Co.

335 S. High St.

Randolph, WI 53957-0001

PH: 800-247-5864

Website: www.jungseed.com

 

K&M Roses

1260 Chicora River Rd.

Buckatunna, MS 39322

PH: 601-648-2908

Email: info@kandmroses.com

Website: www.kandmroses.com

 

Northland Rosarium

9405 S. Williams Lane

Spokane, WA 99224

PH: 509-448-4968

Website: www.northlandrosarium.com

 

Regan Nursery

4286 Decoto Road

Fremont, CA 94555

PH: 510-797-3222

Email: regan@regannursery.com

Website: www.regannursery.com

 

Rogue Valley Roses

P.O. Box 116

Phoenix, OR 97504

PH: 541-535-1307

Website: www.roguevalleyroses.com

10% discount to ARS members

 

Rosemania

4020 Trail Ridge Dr.

Franklin, TN 37067

PH: 888-600-9665

Website – www.rosemania.com

 

Roses Unlimited

363 N. Deerwood Dr.

Laurens, SC 29360

PH: 864-682-7673

Website: www.rosesunlimitedownroot.com

 

Roses of Yesterday & Today Rose Garden

803 Brown’s Valley Road

Watsonville, CA 95076

PH: 831-728-1901

Website: www.rosesofyesterday.com

 

Spring Hill Nurseries

110 West Elm St.

Tipp City, OH 45371-1699

PH: 812-537-2177

Website: www.springhillnursery.com

 

Wayside Gardens

1 Garden Lane

Hodges, SC 29695-0001

PH: 800-845-1124

Website: www.waysidegardens.com

 

White Flower Farm

P.O. Box 50

Litchfield, CT 06759-0050

Ph: 800-503-9624

Website: www.whiteflowerfarm.com

 

Until next time – Stop and smell the roses.

Rosalinda, The Rose Lady

Rosalinda Morgan

Author & Garden Writer

 

 

January 2016 Meeting

The January meeting this coming Sunday, Jan. 10, 2015 will be at James Island Town Hall, 1238-B Camp Rd., James Island. Please note the venue change. Use your GPS or MapQuest. It’s near the James Island Library. There is also a shopping center near there and a Dollar General. Use the right side door, not the main door of the Town Hall. Social Hour at 2:30 pm, Meeting at 3:00 pm.

We are doing something different this month. Instead of a speaker, it will be a members’ discussion. The topic is Getting To Know You. We will have individuals tell a bit about themselves, how they got started with roses and where they are today with their rose-growing – more, less, the same and varieties they find themselves best at growing where they live. It will be an interesting exchange and surely we’ll learn something new from each other.

Come and join us at James Island Town Hall on Sunday, Jan. 10 at 3 pm. Admission is free.

 

AN ANNUAL RITUAL-ROSE PRUNING!

By Sandy Lundberg

 

 

As the end of February approaches, it will again be time to prune roses in the Lowcountry. In order to approach this job effectively, it is desirable to have an understanding of the concept of pruning.   As a rose plant matures each year, it produces new canes. These newer canes are the most desirable, because they will be the most vigorous producers of flowers. Older canes may have become unproductive simply because of the aging of the plant or damage from winds and cold. Removal of these canes will allow room for new productive canes to emerge. There will also be a lot of twiggy growth that will produce inferior stems if not removed.

 

Exactly when should we prune? Let your rose bush and the weather channel be your guide. Generally, it is ideal to prune when the bud eyes have become red and swollen to about very small pea size.   However, we remember what happened two years ago with the early March freezes. Emerging growth of several inches was frozen. For that reason, many area rosarians, including myself delay pruning. We are now waiting until the last week of February in our garden to begin pruning, depending on the weather forecasts.

 

As you begin, pull back the mulch to expose the bud union. Remove any small, twiggy growth, clearing out the middle of the plant. These small canes and branches left in the center are an invitation for disease and insects. Study the canes that are left. Remove any damaged or diseased canes flush with the bud union. The number of canes you leave on the plant will depend on your goals for your garden. If you exhibit and want larger, but fewer flowers, you will want to leave from 3 to 5 canes. If you want garden display, you may want to leave a few more. Now you need to determine which canes to remove. Be sure to remove the cane flush with the bud union and seal.   If any are crossing or rubbing each other, remove the smallest one. If there are canes that are interfering with the plant next to it, you should remove them also.   Leave last year’s new canes if they are undamaged. If any sucker growth is present, remove it also.

 

Cut the canes at a 45 degree angle to an outside healthy bud eye. The height depends on personal preference. If you want fewer, but larger blooms for exhibition, you will want to cut lower. Most exhibitors prune to about 18 to 20 inches. Any canes that have blackened freeze damage should be cut below the damaged area. The same is true for canes damaged by cane borers. This damage can be seen when the cane’s center (pith) is brown. Continue cutting back until healthy white pith can be seen. If you have to go back to the point where the cane is only a few inches short, it is best to remove the cane entirely.   When finished, the bush should have a vase shape with the center completely open. The pruning cuts should be sealed with a sealer such as Elmer’s Glue.

 

In order to encourage basal breaks, you can peel off the loose layers of bark that overlay the bud union or if the bark is not loose, you may gently scrub some off with a wire brush. As long as no late freezes are expected, leave the mulch pushed back to expose the bud union. The exposure to sunshine helps encourage basal breaks.

 

Immediately after pruning, the bushes and surrounding ground should be sprayed with a good fungicide and a good insecticide. Thereafter it is essential that your disease and pest management program be strictly adhered to.   Remove any diseased leaves that may be lying on the ground.

 

At this time, your organic mixture should be lightly scratched into the ground. We use 3 cups per hybrid tea and floribunda and 1 cup per miniature rose.

 

Pruning of floribundas follows the same principles as apply to hybrid teas with a couple of notable exceptions. Generally, floribundas that produce sprays are pruned higher and not as many canes removed. The floribundas that are noted for producing one bloom per stem, such as Sheila’s Perfume, will be pruned the same as hybrid teas.

 

Miniature roses are pruned with the following principle in mind. Remove the smaller, weaker canes, any twiggy growth, and any damaged canes. The number of canes left will depend on the age of the plant. Some newer minis may only have three or four good canes established, where some older plants may have as many as ten or more. Since they are on their own roots, there is not the concern to make room on a bud union for new canes. As with hybrid teas, however, the ideal is to open the middle of the plant as a disease and pest prevention measure. Usually, the height to which I prune depends on the age and thickness of the canes. About 12 to 15 inches for a large mini bush with large canes is sufficient.

 

Good quality tools will make this job much easier:

  1. Felco pruners (never use flat blade pruners as they mash the canes)
  2. Lobbing shears
  3. Pruning saw
  4. Thorn resistant gloves
  5. Elmer’s glue
  6. Wire brush
  7. A jar of alcohol (dip the pruners frequently to avoid transmitting disease)

It is a good idea to carry all of these in a plastic tote.

 

Note: We bought the Felco folding saw and it is great! I don’t have a lot of strength in my right wrist due to rheumatoid arthritis damage. With this saw I can easily saw through very thick canes.